Can spending time with others make us happier?

chris-murray-PXVQ7SNqdME-unsplash-medium
Photo by Chris Murray on Unsplash

TL;DR

There is much to be said about having some time to ourselves in the pursuit of happiness. Many of us enjoy our quiet time whether it is in the form of reading a book, working in the garden or taking a nice long walk.

What is this?

TL;DR (or tl;dr) stands for "too long; didn't read" - it's our way of summing up a topic

Table of Contents

There is much to be said about having some time to ourselves in the pursuit of happiness.  Many of us enjoy our quiet time whether it is in the form of reading a book, working in the garden or taking a nice long walk.

Social = happier

There is growing empirical evidence that suggests that being more social will equate to more happiness over time.  This makes a great deal of sense when we look at our evolutionary existence of surviving in groups, and it should give us pause to reflect on the benefits of communication to us all.

Happiness can play an important role in our health and well-being.  It appears, loneliness or lack of social activity can be deadly.

The former Surgeon General, Dr Vivek Murphy has been quoted as saying: “Loneliness and weak social connections are associated with a reduction in lifespan similar to that caused by smoking 15 cigarettes a day”.  The news media has reported this info many times.  It is most definitely time we pay attention.

More attachment = less depression

In a Harvard Study of Adult Development, researchers reviewed experiences of 82 married couples.  They found that the greater the level of attachment that was reported, indicated lower levels of depression and superior life satisfaction in the future.

Having purpose

A large German study found that participants who reported a desire of pursuing life goals that included more interaction with friends or family, often reported being happier and enjoying more life satisfaction 1 year later.  Participants who reported pursuing non-social activities like ‘Getting a better job’, did not report increased life satisfaction.

Make friends

The evidence offers us a resounding YES to social interaction as a factor that contributes to, health, happiness and longevity.  Get out there and make some friends!

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/0956797618761660 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2394670/ https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25910392/ https://www.webmd.com/balance/news/20180504/loneliness-rivals-obesity-smoking-as-health-risk https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21896239/

Find this topic useful? Share it with the world!

Related Topics

Ask the Experts

Can’t find the answer to your wellness question?

We’d love to hear from you.